abounding

grace harvest garden

A demonstration garden within the grounds of King's Kid for training children in organic agricultural methods.

reflecting god's abounding grace towards us

In 2015 King's Kid partnered with Harvest Gardens, a UK Christian faith-based organisation, dedicated to supporting communities with a life-sustaining food source that is sustainable long-term.

 

Find out more about Harvest Gardens here: www.harvestgardens.co.uk (external link)

 

Harvest Gardens, UK, enabled us to establish what is known as a 'Harvest Garden' at King's Kid. While the area of land we have to work with is small, we hope it will have a big impact. We started the project with three long term goals in mind:

  1. to supplement the children's diet with the addition of a variety of nutrient-rich, home-grown vegetables;

  2. to train the children and staff in sustainable, organic agricultural concepts and methods that work, and

  3. to instill a sense of and the practice of good environmental stewardship, not only within King's Kid, but also in the wider community.

After identifying a suitable plot to work upon within the grounds of King's Kid in Mityana, we began a week long start-up programme under the supervision of an experienced local trainer appointed by Harvest Gardens, which saw the garden take shape.

Participating in this project are volunteers from both primary and secondary students at King's Kid Home School (KKHS), as well as interested staff members.

Genesis 1:29 says, 'Then God said, "I give you every seed-bearing plant on the face of the whole earth and every tree that has fruit with seed in it. They will be yours for food." 

In 2018, the Young Farmers Club of King's Kid was established to protect and maintain the garden to ensure it's continuity. A handful of faithful learners and staff joined the Young Farmers Club and are working hard to this day to produce food for King's Kid and the community.

In an effort to share our success we have included our 'Rules' which guides our work. It can be used as an example to help other schools or organisations wishing to start a Young Farmers Club.

For more information or if you want help or advice to start your own school vegetable garden or Young Farmers Club, please contact us.

KING’S KID YOUNG FARMERS CLUB

 

RULES (updated 05/09/2019)

 

Motto: Dig For Victory

 

Genesis 1:29 – Then God said, “Look! I have given you every seed-bearing plant throughout the earth and all the fruit trees for your food.”

 

What is our vision?

 

King’s Kid producing food for King’s Kid and the community.

 

What is our mission?

 

To strengthen the mission of King’s Kid Ministries International by igniting and nurturing the passion in young people for growing crops and rearing animals without artificial chemicals.

 

 What are our objectives?

 

1. To protect and maintain all the school gardens.

2. To produce a variety of nutrient rich crops and animal products to supplement the diet of children and staff at King’s Kid.

3. To sell enough crops to earn an income for the Club to be self-sustaining.

4. To put what is learnt about agriculture in the school curriculum into practice.

5. To practice at home what is learnt at school.

6. To be good stewards of the environment.

7. To demonstrate successful organic farming methods.

8. To train leaders.

9. To learn how to manage a farm successfully.

10. To report on all Club activities to the School Administration.

 

What are the roles of Young Farmers in Uganda?

 

[1] Young farmers help spread good farming methods.

[2] Young farmers produce food for the community.

 

Who can join?

 

To qualify to be a member of the Young Farmers Club you must be a registered learner or student at King’s Kid. Coordinating Teachers must be teaching or non-teaching staff at the school. Membership is free of charge to new Club members. You must be registered by the Club. You must read and agree to follow the rules and regulations of the Club. The Club involves all the students and learners who are enthusiastic and interested in working in gardening activities. The Coordinating Teachers have a role of coordinating, guiding the Club members, advising, and promoting the Club within the school as well as taking part in decision making of the Club’s activities.

 

Sustainability of the Club

 

1. Leadership: At the end of each year, at the Club’s Annual General Meeting (AGM), new committee members (students and learners) that will lead the club will be elected or appointed. Each committee serves for one year and members not allowed to be re-elected to the committee. This is to allow opportunities for others to lead. The committee is composed of: Chairperson, Vice-Chairperson, Treasurer and Secretary.

 

2. Funds: Club funds can be raised through organising different events that help promote the Club, contributions from the main School budget as well as selling some of the garden products in the local community. This is not money for profit - it is only to sustain the Club’s activities, such as buying new tools to replace worn out ones and buying new seeds etc.

 

Rules and regulations

 

#1 The Cub is open to all learners from P4-P6 at King’s Kid Nursery and Primary School including secondary school and vocational students at King’s Kid except those in candidate classes. Coordinating Teachers from King’s Kid can join voluntarily or as appointed by the School Administration.

 

#2 Learners and students can join the Club at any time.

 

#3 All members must be registered.

 

#4 The Club is led by a learner/ student committee elected by the learners and students themselves or appointed by the Coordinating Teachers at the Club’s AGM.

#5 Coordinating Teachers guide the learner/ student committee in decision-making and supervise all Club activities to make sure the Club runs smoothly.

 

#6 Meetings should be held whenever there is a need and a specific day and time should be agreed upon by the members when meetings should be held.

 

#7 All Club members should work together in the school garden – active participation in all garden activities is a MUST.

 

#8 No Club member is allowed to harvest any crop or animal product from the garden without permission from the Coordinating Teachers.

 

#9 The learner/ student committee has the powers to resolve conflicts, discipline or terminate any indiscipline member under the guidance of the Coordinating Teachers.

 

#10 Record-keeping must be up to date at all times and records of attendance, meetings, reports, harvests and money must be kept safe.

 

#11 Non-Club members are not allowed to harvest any crop from the garden. If anyone, including Club members, is caught he/she must pay for what he/she has stolen by way of a fine as decided by the learner/ student committee under the guidance of the Coordinating Teachers.

 

What is important to us?

 

(1) God-fearing = we love God and whatever we do we believe we are doing it for Him, that’s why we always do our best.

(2) Innovation = we welcome new ideas.

(3) Passion = we love our garden and our school.

(4) Boosting agricultural products = we want to grow and eat more nutritious food.

(5) Team work = we work well together.

(6) Developing skills = we are job makers, not job seekers.

(7) Improving leadership skills = we train leaders amongst us.

(8) Practical = we learn and put agriculture into practice as well as following the school curriculum.

(9) Justice = being fair and honest.

 

What do we do?

 

1) Planning for school gardens.

2) Working on garden activities including, planting, watering, weeding and harvesting.

3) Deciding when to harvest and what to do with the harvest.

4) Organising events within the school to promote the club.

5) Keeping records for the club.

6) Storing garden tools for the club.

7) Holding meetings for the club.

8) Reporting on Club activities regularly to the School Administration.

 

Guiding Principles

 

{1} We give 10% of our entire harvested yield to God by giving it in our local church.

 

{2} We balance serving King’s Kid children and staff with the greatest portion of our harvested yield with earning a sustainable income by selling a portion of our harvested yield to the local community.

 

{3} We recognise the extra work put in by the Club members and the need for motivation and good morale amongst the team by serving them with additional portions of our harvested yield.

 

{4} We are fully accountable to the School Administration in all areas including abiding by the Club’s Financial Controls Policy. Any changes to our Rules must first be proposed to and approved by the School Administration.

Please pray with us as we work towards a harvest beyond any of our expectations.

 

You can follow the progress of Abounding Grace Harvest Garden using the gallery below, from the very start of the project in April 2015, to right where we are now.

Gallery

The images below appear in order of the most recent first.

Last updated: 31/08/2017

Another day another eggplant

Another day another eggplant

The eggplant harvest is upon us. (31/08/2017)

Garden view

Garden view

(11/08/2017)

Preparing carrots

Preparing carrots

You need a lot of carrots to feed 150 children. (10/08/2017)

A match made underground

A match made underground

(10/08/2017)

The carrot harvest is upon us

The carrot harvest is upon us

(09/08/2017)

Eggplants

Eggplants

The first of many eggplants to come. (08/08/2017)

Perfectly formed

Perfectly formed

Bean harvest. (04/04/2017)

Onions

Onions

(27/03/2017)

Drip-irrigation

Drip-irrigation

As modeled by President Y. Museveni himself, from his Kawumu demonstration farm, we've adopted the water saving irrigation method of drip-irrigation for our young matooke plants, just outside our garden. (27/03/2017)

Drip-irrigation

Drip-irrigation

(27/03/2017)

Green beans

Green beans

Our beans, that we planted in January, are almost ready to be harvested. As others in our community have only just planted because they waited for the seasonal rains, we are just harvesting! (27/03/2017)

Shade

Shade

Bordering the garden is a row of plantain bananas which provide shade and shelter to some of the beds. (10/02/2017)

Beans

Beans

Despite it being the beginning of the dry season, we confidently and faithfully watered our seeds until they germinated. Now we are nurturing our seedlings with more water so that they can survive the very hot conditions. (25/01/2017)

Start em' young

Start em' young

Young farmers help plant beans. (10/01/2017)

Young Farmers Club

Young Farmers Club

Rotating crops is a well known and effective practice which has many benefits. Instead of rotating fields, we're rotating beds. In order to restore some vital nitrogen to the soil, we are planting beans over the whole garden during the first season of 2017. (10/01/2017)

Beans

Beans

Beans are nitrogen-fixing legumes. Nitrogen is a vital nutrient to plant growth. So we decide back in September to plant 200g of Nambale beans over a few beds. Today we harvested 1.5kg. (01/12/2016)

Pumpkin harvest

Pumpkin harvest

Pumpkins are highly nutritious and very delicious. As well are eating the flesh, we also spared the seeds, and roasted them. (25/11/2016)

Beautiful pumpkin harvest

Beautiful pumpkin harvest

(26/10/2016)

Preparing kale for the cooking pot

Preparing kale for the cooking pot

(12/10/2016)

Team effort

Team effort

It takes a huge team effort to prepare enough kale for the whole school. At the moment we are harvesting kale at least twice a week. (12/10/2016)

Groundforce team

Groundforce team

Some members of the team with team leader, Peter. Do you see the growth of the kale in the background? (10/10/2016)

Groundforce team

Groundforce team

(10/10/2016)

Groundforce team

Groundforce team

These dedicated young people are the faithful farmers responsible for the upkeep of the garden. (10/10/2016)

New pepper discovery

New pepper discovery

Amongst our crop of hot red peppers, another variety of pepper has sprung up, with much larger orange peppers. This variety must have been in the mix that was first sprayed, before we started growing our own. (27/07/2016)

New kale seedlings

New kale seedlings

(27/07/2016)

Pumpkin flower

Pumpkin flower

(16/07/2016)

Maize harvest

Maize harvest

(06/07/2016)

Maize harvest

Maize harvest

(06/07/2016)

Garden view

Garden view

(04/07/2016)

Organic pesticide

Organic pesticide

The key ingredient, which we are using consistently is readily available now! (02/07/2016)

Red pepper bushes

Red pepper bushes

(02/07/2016)

Maize harvest

Maize harvest

The beginning of a maize harvest. (22/06/2016)

Groundforce assemble

Groundforce assemble

Armed and dedicated, the Groundforce team is responsible for the upkeep of the garden. (04/06/2016)

Pumpkin plant

Pumpkin plant

The pumpkin plant has spread itself over an entire bed! (15/06/2016)

Red hot chilli pepper

Red hot chilli pepper

Our first harvest of hot peppers - the key ingredient of our organic pesticide. (15/06/2016)

Mixed cropping

Mixed cropping

Experimental planting - maize and carrots. The idea is that the maize, as a deep feeder, will pull up nutrients for the carrot also to benefit. Time will tell if it works! (15/06/2016)

Maize

Maize

Our maize has experienced incredible growth. (15/06/2016)

Maize

Maize

Maize plants which were planted with little spacing appear to yield better than well spaced plants. (15/06/2016)

Kale seeds going into a nursery bed

Kale seeds going into a nursery bed

(10/05/2016)

Maize experiment

Maize experiment

Though not strictly a vegetable, in an effort to improve our planting methods, we are inter-cropping maize with carrots in the same beds. Perhaps the effect of the maize pulling up nutrients from the deeper soil will positively effect the growth of the carrots planted nearby. (14/04/2016)

Harvesting carrots

Harvesting carrots

Our favourite time of the season. (03/04/2016)

Carrots make us this happy

Carrots make us this happy

(03/04/2016)

Preparing beds

Preparing beds

(03/04/2016)

Garden view

Garden view

(15/05/2016)

Pumpkin!

Pumpkin!

Planted in April 2016. (09/05/2016)

Water - a key input to our success

Water - a key input to our success

It is usual for us to plant in the dry season now, as we have our very own rainwater storage tank to tap water from. This gives us the advantage of wall-to-wall sunshine for months as well as a plentiful supply of water.

Peri peri fruits

Peri peri fruits

The very seeds we scattered as a pesticide have grown up and we will soon be harvesting our own peri peri, instead of buying it in from outside sources! Wonderful.

New potatoes

New potatoes

A fresh bed of new potatoes (locally known as Irish potatoes). (09/05/2016)

We start young

We start young

At King's Kid, we like to involve the young children as much as possible in learning how to grow organic vegetables. (09/05/2016)

Cabbage harvest

Cabbage harvest

(26/03/2016)

Cabbage harvest

Cabbage harvest

(26/03/2016)

Final harvest of eggplant

Final harvest of eggplant

Before uprooting the remaining eggplants, it was time for one last harvest. We managed a sack. This will supplement the children's food at King's Kid Home School for a few days. (08/03/2016)

End of the eggplants

End of the eggplants

The eggplants had a good run in Abounding Grace Harvest Garden, but it was time to rotate the crops. So they all had to come out. (08/03/2016)

Red hot chili pepper

Red hot chili pepper

Amongst the bed of carrots, some of the red hot chili pepper seeds, which were thrown down to deter caterpillars, germinated and are bringing forth fruit of their own. This is good news and means that we shall not have to buy more chili next time. (08/03/2016)

Cabbages round 2

Cabbages round 2

Though planted at the dawn of the dry season, our rainwater storage tank has sustained the cabbage growth to an unbelievable size. (08/03/2016)

Onion harvest

Onion harvest

08/03/2016

Cabbages coming along nicely

Cabbages coming along nicely

(16/02/2016)

We 'mulch'

We 'mulch'

Mulch is a covering, as of dead/dry plant material, spread on the ground around plants to prevent excessive evaporation or erosion, enrich the soil and inhibit weed growth. (12/01/2016)

Cabbage seedlings

Cabbage seedlings

(12/01/2016)

Onions

Onions

(12/01/2016)

Eggplants

Eggplants

(12/01/2016)

Healthy looking carrots

Healthy looking carrots

(12/01/2016)

Composting

Composting

We built a new compost heap from the remains of the uprooted kale storks from last season, dried cut grass from the compound of King's Kid and soil. Layer upon layer we piled the materials adding water at each level to help activate the microorganisms which breakdown the biomass. Within 3 months we expect compost to be ready! (30/12/2015)

Eggplant harvest

Eggplant harvest

(30/12/2015)

Cabbage seedlings

Cabbage seedlings

These are a batch of freshly transplanted cabbage seedlings. (30/12/2015)

Resilient

Resilient

These kale seedlings were almost decimated by chickens, but signs of new growth from the stems are encouraging. (19/12/2015)

Rainwater-harvesting

Rainwater-harvesting

This exciting development at the King's Kid Medical Clinic to collect rainwater from the roof of the health unit, will equally benefit the garden because of it's close proximity to he garden and it's sustainable nature. (19/12/2015)

Red hot chili pepper

Red hot chili pepper

When we made and used our own organic pesticide last season to rid us of a caterpillar invasion, seeds of the little red hot chili pepper (the main ingredient) left behind, have sprung up into new plants! This will provide us our own source for the ingredient in the future.

Carrot seedlings

Carrot seedlings

Kale seedlings, Dec 2015

Kale seedlings, Dec 2015

Ready for transplanting for season 2 in Abounding Grace Harvest Garden. (11/12/2015)

Eggplant seedlings, Dec 2015

Eggplant seedlings, Dec 2015

These eggplants seedlings survived a chicken AND pig invasion! Ready for transplanting for season 2 in Abounding Grace Harvest Garden. (11/12/2015)

Eggplants

Eggplants

These eggplants, first planted in April 2015, are still bearing huge eggplants. (11/12/2015)

Cabbage seedlings

Cabbage seedlings

It will be 2 more weeks before these seedlings are ready to be transplanted for season 2 in Abounding Grace Harvest Garden. (11/12/2015)

Fast growth

Fast growth

Irish potatoes taking advantage of the intense rain and sunshine - perfect growing conditions. (18/11/2015)

Potatoes emerge

Potatoes emerge

Potatoes (Irish potatoes as they are known locally) emerge through the soil surface. (04/11/2015)

Incredible growth

Incredible growth

"It's like walking through a forest." Timothy, in P3 class, stands amongst the crop of kale we planted 6 months ago to give you an idea of the scale of growth that we are experiencing. (21/10/2015)

YWAM team lends helping hands

YWAM team lends helping hands

Thank you YWAMers for your heart to serve with us. (20/10/2015)

Potato planting in action

Potato planting in action

(20/10/2015)

Potato addition

Potato addition

A local church member donated some potatoes to the garden, so we promptly gave up a bed to accommodate the versatile veg. With the help a visiting YWAM team, we planted! (20/10/2015)

Sukuma seedlings (kale)

Sukuma seedlings (kale)

Kale (known locally as sukuma wiki), has gone down an absolute treat at King's Kid over the last four months, since we first planted it. We've been harvesting it so consistently that it's made a significant difference to the children's diet. It's been so successful, it's so tasty and it's so good for you that we're planting some more. These little ones have just germinated in the nursery bed, ready for the second season in Abounding Grace Harvest Garden. (17/10/2015)

New nursery bed construction

New nursery bed construction

We learnt from the last nursery bed that we built, that building the shelter the correct height above the ground is very important to allow enough light (but not too much) to reach the newly germinated seeds below. We used an old, torn mosquito net on the roof of the shelter to catch any debris from the material used for shade. (04/10/2015)

New nursery bed

New nursery bed

Seeds have been sown in a new nursery bed ready for the next season. A nursery bed is necessary to protect the seeds and subsequent seedlings from harsh weather conditions and to allow us to select the best seedlings for transplanting. (04/10/2015)

Coriander seeds

Coriander seeds

We collected and dried the seeds from our coriander plants, ready for planting next season. (01/09/2015)

Into the market

Into the market

Our surplus green peppers are adorning the shelves of grocers in our local community. (01/09/2015)

Flowering kale

Flowering kale

(31/08/2015)

Eggplants arriving

Eggplants arriving

(31/08/2015)

Surplus

Surplus

With more green peppers than we can stomach, it's off to the market to sell as much as we can. (19/08/2015)

Carrots & green pepper

Carrots & green pepper

What a harvest. The first carrots we've uprooted and they are delicious. We'll be adding them to the beans later. (19/08/2015)

Regular harvesting

Regular harvesting

We are harvesting 4-5 cabbages 3 times a week, and the kids are loving it in the beans. (19/08/2015)

Church offering

Church offering

We offered 14 cabbages in church! What a blessing. (16/08/2015)

Spraying

Spraying

With the same machine used for spraying bedbug insecticide, we sprayed the garden with our homemade organic pesticide (peri peri concentrate - consisting of crushed red hot chilli peppers and water). Very effective, and best of all, organic. (12/08/2015)

Pulling up cabbages

Pulling up cabbages

(12/08/2015)

Flowering eggplant

Flowering eggplant

First the flower. Then the fruit! (09/08/2015)

First harvest of green peppers

First harvest of green peppers

(05/08/2015)

Very excited to harvest...

Very excited to harvest...

(05/08/2015)

Harvesting time

Harvesting time

(05/08/2015)

Green peppers

Green peppers

(01/08/2015)

A very-nearly-ready green pepper

A very-nearly-ready green pepper

Coriander in flower

Coriander in flower

Cabbages folding

Cabbages folding

Have you ever seen something more beautiful?

Flowering green pepper

Flowering green pepper

2 1/2 months after planting

2 1/2 months after planting

Organic pesticide

Organic pesticide

In order to deter caterpillars (our no. 1 pest) we came up with a blend of red hot chili peppers, coriander, garlic and wood ash. In concentrated doses it has proven effective.

Filtering pesticide

Filtering pesticide

Coriander

Coriander

We noticed that the caterpillars were less interested in the coriander in the garden. So we added some to our organic pesticide mix.

Watering

Watering

Consistent watering has enabled us to achieve tremendous growth, even during a dry season.

Applying pesticide to cabbages

Applying pesticide to cabbages

Harvesting kale

Harvesting kale

First ever harvest of kale

First ever harvest of kale

Harvesting kale from sacks

Harvesting kale from sacks

Main ingredient

Main ingredient

Abounding Grace Harvest Garden consumes a lot of water everyday. In order to help supply it's needs we would like to install a rainwater harvesting system at King's Kid Medical Clinic, as part of the overall sustainability plan for the ministry base in Mityana.

Sukuma

Sukuma

This green leafed veg is almost ready for harvesting. The amazing thing about sukuma is that, the more you pluck off the big ready leaves, the more leaves it brings forth! We'll be harvesting these plants for months.

Carrot forest

Carrot forest

Amazing growth 7 weeks since planting.

Sack farming

Sack farming

3 weeks after transplanting cabbage seedlings into this sack, and now this...

Come visit us sometime

Come visit us sometime

AGHG 7 weeks since planting

AGHG 7 weeks since planting

Cabbage: transplanted after 3 weeks

Cabbage: transplanted after 3 weeks

With only a fraction of the seedlings actually transplanted, every bed in the garden was full! So, we resorting to filling every flower bed within the grounds of King's Kid which had available space with seedlings and...

Disturbance in the undergrowth

Disturbance in the undergrowth

It's amazing what you come across while digging.

Cabbage seedling nursery

Cabbage seedling nursery

Once germinated, we erected a small shelter over the cabbage seedlings to protect them from direct sunlight.

Green peppers catching up

Green peppers catching up

Finally, the green peppers are putting on leaf, 7 weeks since planting.

Carrots: germinated after 6 days

Carrots: germinated after 6 days

We had a bit of a scare one morning when we learnt of a single pig escaping from the Piggery Project and trampling over a couple of beds in the Kitchen plot. Thankfully, the carrots were unharmed.

Sack farming. Space saving.

Sack farming. Space saving.

We realised that just because we lack available land, doesn't mean we cannot create more growing space. We filled old sacks with soil and a central column of small stones for aeration and irrigation. Then we transplanted our cabbage seedlings into the sides and on top of the sacks.

Cabbage: germinated after 3 days

Cabbage: germinated after 3 days

Much to our excitement.

Composting and mulching

Composting and mulching

Initially, the 5ft high compost heap generated a lot of interest in the community - many asked what it was. Within 3 months the compost material will have broken down fully and will be ready for application to the garden beds. Notice the two nursery beds (foreground) covered by mulch material.

Rows of seeds

Rows of seeds

Marking shallow trenches for the seeds to go in.

All important spacing

All important spacing

Planting with the correct spacing is crucial to maximise the productivity of the beds as well as ensuring the best possible harvest, as plants have not had to compete with one another for nutrients or sunlight.

Kitchen plot

Kitchen plot

The second area, is here, behind the school kitchen.

Double-digging

Double-digging

One of the farming principles we are following is that of double-digging which means we dig deeper to loosen the soil at a greater depth (2ft). The reason behind this is to improve irrigation and aeration of the soil as well as enabling plant roots to penetrate deeper, thus accessing more nutrients.

Balance

Balance

In order not to compact the freshly loosened soil, we used planks to stand on as the digging progressed.

Medical Clinic plot

Medical Clinic plot

We identified two small areas of land suitable for cultivation within the grounds of King's Kid. The first, is here, in front of King's Kid Medical Clinic.

Many hands

Many hands

The team of staff and students of King's Kid can be seen here helping with the most labour intensive part of the project, double-digging.

Dedicated

Dedicated

Everybody has a talent, maybe with their hands or how they communicate. Setting up a garden at King's Kid has given the children the opportunity to participate in an activity that many of them are passionate about, farming. It has enabled them to demonstrate their abilities outside of the four walls of a classroom.

Tools of choice

Tools of choice

Harvest Gardens (UK) fully funded the purchase of all the tools and seeds we would need to begin the garden. All the items were bought locally in Mityana town.

Beginning

Beginning

"Do not despise these small beginnings" - Zechariah 4:10

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